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5 Favorite Things About a Tales2go Building License

As School Library Month wraps up, we wanted to share 5 Favorite Things About a Tales2go Building License, according to current subscribers. As this is our most popular subscription offering, we’ve received a lot of great feedback.

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1. Equitable year-round access for all students

It's tough to find resources that all your students can access easily, let alone simultaneously. A Tales2go building license provides a license for each school-owned device and take-home licenses for all students and staff members in a school. Once logged in, everyone gets equal access to the entire catalog of over 7,800 titles - simultaneously, and on demand.

Especially valuable is the ability to use licenses at school and home, all year round. And with bookmarks, students can start listening to a title at school, on a school-owned device, and pick back up where they left off on a personal device when they get home. A building license is also a great way to extend library resources into the summer, listening above grade level is an ideal way to combat the Summer Slide.

2. A multicultural resource

We know from research that students are more excited and engaged with reading when they can relate to the characters or recognize aspects of the story. The Tales2go library includes a wide selection of multicultural books and stories that are not only about characters who look like your diverse student body, but are also read by professional narrators who sound like the people your students live with and recognize. 

The lack of culturally-relevant literature for readers of many groups is well known. Publishers are producing more books with diverse perspectives, but school resource restrictions typically limit acquisitions. 49% of children living in the United States are members of a minority group. That means those children have a difficult time finding books that reflect their lives and experiences.

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3. Limitless flexibility by classroom and grade

The Tales2go catalog spans pre-K through high school, fiction and nonfiction, and includes Spanish and French language titles. Early grade teachers can use Tales2go as part of a literacy rotation (i.e., a dedicated listen-to-reading station), or during choice time. Foreign language teachers, on the other hand, might want their students to listen to known fairy tales in Spanish or French to improve their listening comprehension. And high school history teachers might add listening to historic speeches to their units. Given the expanse and depth of the catalog, there's something for every teacher at every grade level.

2018 Apr Foreign Language

4. Filter titles you don’t need

Many K-5 schools prefer not to include pre-teen and young adult titles. No problem, a district can request to limit the catalog for their K-5 schools, while still permitting middle and high schools access to the entire catalog.

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5. 
Multiple ways to set-up access to Tales2go at school and home

Tales2go works on desktops, laptops, and most mobile devices. Access can be established with dedicated login credentials - the same as students are already using with other services - single sign-on (e.g., GAFE) and in certain circumstances IP authentication, allowing students in a building to launch Tales2go without any login prompt. Different from many services, once a device is logged into Tales2go, it stays logged in until you decide or need to log it out.

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**Editor's Note: This post was written by Darcy Pattison, from Mims House, a publisher whose books are now available on Tales2go. This is an excerpted repost. Read more at Mims House.

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