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"Just Listening" is Just Right!

Many people are confused when we say Tales2Go doesn't have the text for students to follow along. I'll explain! By design, Tales2Go provides your students with "just listening" for a few reasons.

Listening is it's own, separate skill, elevated to the same height as reading, writing and speaking according to the Common Core State Standards. This means that listening needs to be done separately, on it's own since listening comprehension actually outpaces reading comprehension until about 8th grade.

"Just listening" to reading might take some kids a little time to get used to, but once they "get it," they get it! When you take away the physical text, students begin to visualize, make pictures, connections and meaning. They are not focused on decoding tough words, and they are able to hear fluent, expressive reading. Exposing students to rich, sophisticated spoken language from birth provides them with the vocabulary they need to succeed throughout their school years.

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Parents and teachers alike know that there is never enough time to read aloud to your kids! Tales2Go should be used in addition to reading to your kids. Classroom teachers also love to use Tales2Go during small group guided reading and as an independent or choice time activity.

How do you use Tales2Go? Let us know what works for you.

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Happy listening!

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