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Teachers College Curriculum & Tales2go

Does your school or district follow the Teachers College Curriculum through Columbia University?

Tales2go fits nicely into the key components of the Teachers College Reading and Writing Project and here's how...

Choices & Variety
Tales2go provides unlimited access to 6,600 (and growing) high-quality titles from leading publishers. Students have fiction and non-fiction books and stories at their fingertips, both of which are essential to Balanced Literacy. You can download the current Tales2go catalog here.

Leveled Texts
Assigned texts are frequently based on student reading level. Tales2go provides the appropriate age and grade level for each title. Lexile level and AR points are also presented when available.
Audio books allow students to listen at a higher level since they are not decoding or struggling with pronunciations of words. Students may find that their interest level is being matched more closely when they are listening at a higher level.

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Home Connections
With a building subscription, students have a “BYOD” license to use at home. This means students will simply login to a device at home and have the same unlimited access to all audio books. This is a similar approach to the way students take leveled books to and from school. Parents are encouraged to listen with their children, ask questions and have discussions.

family listening

Release of Responsibility Model
The flexibility of Tales2go makes the gradual release of responsibility simple. Educators can begin by using Tales2go as a whole class read aloud, pointing out listening techniques, possible assignments and features. Next, in small guided reading groups, students can dive into one title at a time, focusing on a topic or skill currently being taught. Now students are familiar with the process of using Tales2go and are ready to listen independently at school and at home. Providing access to graphic organizers or other activities is essential. You can find many lesson plans, organizers and activities on our website.

Boy in Berkeley listening

Track Progress
Students can keep track of titles listened to on a book log and can show improvements on the STAR, DIBELS or other assessment tool. Progress will also be shown as they move to new reading groups.

Elements of Reading Workshop
Some examples to integrate Tales2go include:

Read Aloud: Use shorter Tales2go titles for a quick lesson, or longer titles (and use our bookmark feature to keep your place) for a literature study. Students get excited about reading and hear the “rhythm of language.”

Shared Reading: Students could be following along in a print version of the text if available, chiming in when possible, or just listening within a group.

Guided Reading: Educators use Tales2go titles to model fluency and work on skills and strategies with students in small groups at their level (or slightly above with audio books.)

Literature Study: Students can discuss a text they listened to in their literature group. Discussions might be about author’s purpose, voice, craft, or even making connections to other texts or real life events.

Independent Reading: Students take ownership of their learning by choosing titles and listening on their own. Students can apply strategies learned in whole group and small group lessons as they listen.

Word Study: Students develop vocabulary by listening to fluently read words in context. They hear patterns and acquire word knowledge they will retain and use in all aspects of literacy.

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We also have some information about how Tales2go fits into the Common Core on this blog post. Let us know if we can help explain how we fit into YOUR curriculum!

Happy listening :)

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We believe children need to be good listeners before they can become great readers. We also believe that listening skills lead to better writing skills - for many of the same reasons.

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