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Heroes of History Guides

HHH LogoOur friends over at Dorktales Storytime Podcast are sharing some FUNtastic activity guides to accompany their Hidden Heroes of History titles. Each activity guide is tailored specifically to each story and designed to help improve listening comprehension and get students engaged and excited about the already interesting content!

Bookmark this page - we'll add new resources as they become available.

12765Mary Golda Ross

The true tale of a woman who reached for the stars! Mary Golda Ross was one of the first women to rise in the ranks of engineering and one of the first Native Americans in the field. Her work in the early days of spaceflight was very important and is still to this day.

Click here for the activity guide. The password is the first word in the name of the kind publisher providing this resource, all lowercase (hint: d*******s).

12766Louis Armstrong

A tale of Mississippi river boats, parasol parades and breaking racial barriers! A man that built a music legacy and a legacy beyond music—Louis Armstrong transformed jazz music and became the beloved “Ambassador Satch” who performed all over the world! So much of his life was about a deep passion for music and using it to bring people together.

Click here for the activity guide. The password is the first word in the name of the kind publisher providing this resource, all lowercase (hint: d*******s).

12767Tenzing Norgay

A story of adventure and record-breaking feats! Tenzing Norgay, a true pioneer of mountaineering, carved out new paths for future explorers by climbing up the road less traveled. Tenzing was the Sherpa guide responsible for getting Edmund Hillary to the final ascent of Mount Everest. They became the first recorded pair to reach the highest point on earth.

Click here for the activity guide. The password is the first word in the name of the kind publisher providing this resource, all lowercase (hint: d*******s).

12800-1George Washington Carver

A story of perseverance and the power of plants! Despite the barriers thrust upon him, George Washington Carver overcame society’s challenges to ultimately become one of the nation’s leading botanists and agricultural inventors. Did you know he discovered over 300 uses for the peanut? Carver used his celebrity to speak on racial harmony, hoping to leave the world a better place. This episode includes discussions about slavery and systemic racism. The script for this episode about George Washington Carver was reviewed by a sensitivity reader from SensitivityReviews.com database. 

Click here for the activity guide. The password is the first word in the name of the kind publisher providing this resource, all lowercase (hint: d*******s).

12902Wilma Rudolph

An Olympian tale with a golden outcome! Told as a child she’d never walk again to becoming the first American woman to win three gold medals in the 1960 Olympics - Wilma Rudolph was a champion on and off the track. She used her popularity as the “fastest woman in the world” to become a world-record-breaking voice for civil justice and women’s rights.

Click here for the activity guide. The password is the first word in the name of the kind publisher providing this resource, all lowercase (hint: d*******s).

Dorktales Podcast Merlin Tuttle_1200Merlin Tuttle

A story of bat caves, field notes and righting a wrong reputation! Merlin Tuttle has spent his career studying bats and proving why they are an incredibly vital part of the ecosystem. His research, books, lectures and National Geographic style photography have led to the knowledge that bats are not spooky but spectacular! Meet the hero who showed the world that the some of the smallest creatures are making the biggest contributions—the real “batman” and champion protector of nature’s delightful, dark-winged, do-gooders.

Click here for the activity guide. The password is the first word in the name of the kind publisher providing this resource, all lowercase (hint: d*******s).

13191Hedy Lamarr

The Dorktales Broadcasting System presents a Tinseltown tale of scientific experiments and world-changing inventions! Who knew that Hollywood’s famous film star in the 1930’s was one of the most brilliant minds of her time? Adored by the public as “the most beautiful woman in the world,” Hedy Lamarr’s real talent was technological innovation and invention—from light up dog collars to aircraft wing design! But her most extraordinary achievement was the frequency-hopping technology she developed in the 1940s. It is the foundation of every cell phone, GPS, Bluetooth and wi-fi network in use today.

Click here for the activity guide. The password is the first word in the name of the kind publisher providing this resource, all lowercase (hint: d*******s).

13277Maria Tallchief

A head-twirling tale of fairies, firebirds and en pointe feats! Maria Tallchief is a trailblazing dancer who leapt into fame to become America’s first Prima Ballerina. Her technical precision and unique style of dance - full of energy, speed and passion - put American ballet on the map. Early in her career, she was told to change her last name, but Ms. Tallchief refused to hide her Native American heritage and Osage roots. Her successful dance career and worldwide adoration proved the naysayers wrong!

Click here for the activity guide. The password is the first word in the name of the kind publisher providing this resource, all lowercase (hint: d*******s).

Ruth Asawa Ruth Asawa

A story of artistic triumph and long-lasting legacies! Ruth Asawa is one of California's most beloved sculptors and was an influential advocate for arts education. She persisted through extreme prejudice and the injustice of Japanese internment camps to become a master at her craft. Today, her remarkable work lives on - from installations in famous museums, to monuments in city parks, to The Ruth Asawa San Francisco School of the Arts!

Dorktales Podcast Evelyn Cheesman_1200Evelyn Cheesman

A tale that leads to an extinct volcano’s summit! Evelyn Cheesman’s deep love of the natural world led her to becoming the first woman curator at the London Zoo and leading entomologist for the Natural History Museum. From 1923 to 1953, she traveled to remote locations on solo-expeditions (unheard of for a woman at the time) where she observed, collected and catalogued previously undiscovered insects, reptiles, amphibians, and plants - over 70,000 of them! Scientists are still identifying new species from the specimens she discovered over 40 years ago.

Click here for the activity guide. The password is the first word in the name of the kind publisher providing this resource, all lowercase (hint: dork****s).

For a listing of all the Hidden Heroes of History titles, visit the player.

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